Photos from S. Abington Twp. back yard spark debate over alleged mountain lion sighting

By Tom Venesky - tvenesky@timesleader.com
The cat seen on a camera in South Abington Township does have the tawny color of a mountain lion but lacks the long tail. The black spots on the belly and legs identify the feline as a bobcat - Facebook photo

A family’s security camera captured a few images of a large cat last Saturday, but it’s just not the type of feline many people imagined would be lurking in the woods in these parts.

Photos of the cat, taken in South Abington Township, were posted to Facebook by WNEP’s Kurt Aaron and soon after the speculation began.

Many people believed the large feline was a mountain lion — a species that hasn’t existed in the wild in Pennsylvania for more than 100 years.

But the Pennsylvania Game Commission says the photos are of a bobcat, not a mountain lion.

According to Bill Williams, information and education supervisor for the Game Commission’s Northeast Region in Dallas, there are several indicators that point toward the animal being a bobcat.

“It’s low to the ground; it doesn’t appear longer than the gate in the photo and there’s no tail,” Williams said. “It appears to be a bobcat.”

And it appears the case of mistaken identity is nothing new.

Williams said his office receives a couple dozen reports each year about suspected mountain lion sightings.

So far, he said, none of them have been proven. Usually, the sightings are house cats that were spotted at a deceiving angle or in certain light conditions to make them appear larger. Bobcats are also often confused for mountain lions, Williams said, but sometimes the reports are simply nothing more than a hoax.

“Someone takes a picture of a mountain lion from somewhere else, it gets sent around as being seen in Pennsylvania,” Williams said. “But sometimes people just believe that there are mountain lions here and they tend to fill in the blanks whenever a photo surfaces.”

Still, it can be easy to confuse a bobcat for a mountain lion at times, and Williams himself almost made the mistake. Several years ago when he was a district officer patrolling Sullivan County, a large cat ran across the road just before dark.

“I saw the way it bounded across the road and the size, and my brain just filled in the blanks that I just saw a mountain lion,” Williams said. “But when I turned around and looked at the spot, I saw it was a bobcat. That proved to me how easy it is to trick yourself.”

Williams acknowledged there are people who would like to see mountain lions return to Pennsylvania as a symbol of wilderness, but right now there are no wild, reproducing populations in the state.

“Of all the reports we get, none are ever in the winter when there’s snow and we can see a track,” Williams said. “People have thousands of trail cameras in the woods today and there are hunters pursuing coyotes during the winter, so you would think a cat would turn up if they were out there.”

The cat seen on a camera in South Abington Township does have the tawny color of a mountain lion but lacks the long tail. The black spots on the belly and legs identify the feline as a bobcat
https://www.theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/web1_BC1.jpgThe cat seen on a camera in South Abington Township does have the tawny color of a mountain lion but lacks the long tail. The black spots on the belly and legs identify the feline as a bobcat Facebook photo
Photos from Lackawanna County back yard spark debate over alleged mountain lion sighting

By Tom Venesky

tvenesky@timesleader.com

Reach Tom Venesky at 570-991-6395 or on Twitter @TomVenesky

Reach Tom Venesky at 570-991-6395 or on Twitter @TomVenesky