Attack Computers owner hoping for success with brick and mortar tore

By Charles Erickson - For Abington Journal | February 6th, 2018 11:03 am

SOUTH ABINGTON TWP. – Chuck Atak knows there’s a problem with the sign over the front door of his business. He’s aware that “Attack Computors” should read “Attack Computers,” but the logo was designed by his 13-year-old son Faik and the father’s judgment was clouded by paternal admiration.

“I thought it was good and I wanted him to be proud of himself,” Atak said. The store had been open for 90 minutes and he had not received a single patron. “I didn’t check the spelling and I sent it to the sign company, and they didn’t recognize the error.” He then laughed at how this oversight had become memorialized on the signage.

Attack Computers was launched four months ago in the small retail plaza at 860 Northern Blvd. The shop, which is long and narrow like the fuselage of an airliner, specializes in selling the kinds of laptop and desktop computers favored by gamers, and offers repairs of broken smartphones and malfunctioning computers.

“This is my first store and I wanted it to be successful, but right now we have not had too many customers yet,” Atak said.

The business began in 2004, when Atak – a native of Turkey – was in New Jersey earning a doctoral degree in criminal justice. A self-taught technician, he paid his rent and tuition from the fees he earned by fixing computers.

In 2008, Atak, his wife and two sons returned to Turkey so he could work as an associate professor at a police academy. The family came back to the United States in 2016 and settled in Clarks Summit. A third child was born after their arrival.

Atak restarted his computer business two years ago. He began buying, repairing and reselling laptops. Using eBay mostly, he purchases machines having various problems, scavenges them for parts, and uses those pieces to build a functional machine. Gaming machines are similar to standard laptop computers but have certain hardware, such as special video cards, that allow them to output the complex imagery demanded by gamers.

“I have repaired and sold a lot of laptops,” Atak said, sitting behind his sales counter and looking at a widescreen monitor. He was on eBay, checking the status of the 22 items he had listed for sale. There were assorted gaming machine models from the manufacturers Alienware and Lenovo. Thinkpads, also made by Lenovo, were being sold as traditional workstations.

Prices ranged from $400 to $2,000. The same products listed on Atak’s eBay store were displayed for sale in his retail shop, which is open every day but Sunday.

“I’m trying to sell them fast, so my prices are low,” he said. “I have to pay the rent and other stuff, so I try and sell things fast.”

Atak signed a two-year lease last October. Store revenues have been far below the forecasts he made prior to opening day. Through the last week of January, he said, he had recorded just $1,000 in sales in the physical location.

“I’m paying this lease from my online sales,” he said. “It is very tough.”

A retailer of tobacco products was the previous tenant of the storefront, and Atak is using many of the fixtures left behind. There are glass windows in sections of the counter, and displayed behind those are new USB drives and old Apple iPhones the owner is cannibalizing for parts.

The laptops are kept in a case behind the counter, near the bench where Atak performs his repair work.

Along the northern wall, opposite the counter, is the inventory of smartphone cases, chargers, protectors, adapters and cords hung from pegs.

“People come, sometimes, for us to fix their cellphones and they buy some stuff,” Atak said.

His smartphone repairs are limited to fixes of cracked screens and broken cases.

“I first buy parts online, and then I put some labor on it, and then I repair it,” he said, explaining his process. It takes him about two days to turn around a smartphone repair job.

His wife, a math teacher when they lived in Turkey, is now raising the baby. The patriarch did receive positive financial

His smartphone repairs are limited to fixes of cracked screens and broken cases.

“I first buy parts online, and then I put some labor on it, and then I repair it,” he said, explaining his process. It takes him news recently, even if was related to his former occupation.

“I got some offers from universities. They offered me some part-time jobs as an instructor in criminal justice,” Atak said. “And I’m thinking about doing it in my spare time.”

Attack Computers gets its name as a play on owner Chuck Atak’s last name. The shop specializes in gaming computers, which have high-performance video cards and other hardware designed for use in playing video games. Atak typically buys machines online, repairs them, and sells them online or in his store, which opened four months ago in S South Abington Twp.
https://www.theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/web1_ABJAttack1.jpgAttack Computers gets its name as a play on owner Chuck Atak’s last name. The shop specializes in gaming computers, which have high-performance video cards and other hardware designed for use in playing video games. Atak typically buys machines online, repairs them, and sells them online or in his store, which opened four months ago in S South Abington Twp. Charles Erickson | For Abington Journal
As late as the 1950s, electronic computers were still called ‘computors,’ but that spelling fell out of favor. Attack Computers’ sign is misspelled, not as a way of differentiating the business but because the owner failed to proofread the logo designed by his 13-year-old son.
https://www.theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/web1_ABJAttack2.jpgAs late as the 1950s, electronic computers were still called ‘computors,’ but that spelling fell out of favor. Attack Computers’ sign is misspelled, not as a way of differentiating the business but because the owner failed to proofread the logo designed by his 13-year-old son. Charles Erickson | For Abington Journal
Chuck Atak, owner of Attack Computers, is shown near some of the smartphone accessories he sells in his store, which opened in South Abington Twp. last October. Attack Computers was started many years ago as an online store. The owner is disappointed with the amount of business he has received in his brick-and-mortar location.
https://www.theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/web1_ABJAttack3.jpgChuck Atak, owner of Attack Computers, is shown near some of the smartphone accessories he sells in his store, which opened in South Abington Twp. last October. Attack Computers was started many years ago as an online store. The owner is disappointed with the amount of business he has received in his brick-and-mortar location. Charles Erickson | For Abington Journal
Brick and mortar store not busy enough for Chuck Atak

By Charles Erickson

For Abington Journal

Reach the Abington Journal newsroom at 570-587-1148 or by email at news@theabingtonjournal.com.


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